Wednesday , June 16 2021

The Japanese cargo ship leaves the space station. Next stop: Oblivion.



A robust Japanese freighter abandoned the International Space Station on Wednesday (November 7) to the weekend date when forgotten to reach a successful resale assignment.

The astronauts from the station released the HTV-7 shipyard with a robot at 11.51 EST (1651 GMT) when both spacecraft sailed 254 miles above the North Pacific. Japan's Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched a cargo ship station to deliver more than 5 tons (4.5 tons) of fresh food, science supplies and other supplies by the end of September.

"The crew of Expedition 57 wishes to thank the entire JAXA program and the design team for the incorrect design and implementation of HTV-7's security of supply," the European Space Agency's commander Alexander Gerst sent Mission Control after the successful dismantling. The cargo ship, he added, is an essential part of a truly international effort to support the only space in the world. Gerst used a robotic arm to release HTV-7's NASA astronaut, supported by Serena Auñón-Canada. [Japan’s Huge HTV Space Truck Explained (Infographic)]

JAXA's HTV carriers (short H-2 transport vehicles) are disposable spacecraft designed to transport tons of supplies to the space station and then leave and deliberately fire in the atmosphere of the world at the end of the mission. The spacecraft, also known as the Kounotori (Japanese "White Stork"), belongs to Japan, Russia, Europe and the United States, which have maintained their position over the last 18 years.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's HTV-7 aircraft will be seen at the International Space Station on November 7, 2018. It delivered more than 5 tons of supplies to the orbit.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's HTV-7 aircraft will be seen at the International Space Station on November 7, 2018. It delivered more than 5 tons of supplies to the orbit.

Trust: NASA TV

HTV-7 provided some critical supplies to the crew of the International Space Station, including six new batteries in the orbit solar power grid. It also contained two small-sized cubes on a space-saving test (which was introduced on October 6) and a small re-entry capsule, which in Japan's first attempt to restore trials on Earth. If all goes well, the capsule will be put in place just before HTV-7 falls on Earth over the South Pacific over Saturday (Nov. 10), NASA officials said.

The tapered vehicle called HTV's small return cap is 0.8 meters (2.7 meters), 0.8 meters long (0.6 m) and weighs 397 kilograms (180 kilograms).

This NASA graphic representation shows the location of the HTV-7 vessel and the relative size of the HTV Small Return Capsule. The capsule tests the sample return technology when it falls to Earth on 10 November 2018.

This NASA graphic representation shows the location of the HTV-7 vessel and the relative size of the HTV Small Return Capsule. The capsule tests the sample return technology when it falls to Earth on 10 November 2018.

Trust: NASA TV

"The recovery capsule is removed from the shell when deorbit burns," NASA officials said in their statement. "The experimental capsule performs parachuting dewatering on the Japanese coast, where the JAXA vessel stands to revitalize it."

NASA officials said the capsule carried the results of the protein test for the growth of the protein.

Gerst hoped the team would be behind the back potential capsule in the upcoming technology test. He and his Expedition 57 crew packed the capsule with their pilot and attached it to the HTV-7 hatch.

"We congratulate all engineers involved in the successful design and assembly of a small return capsule, and we look forward to returning to the capsule mission's most exciting and exciting phase of return and decline."

E-mail Tariq Malik at [email protected] or follow her @tariqjmalik. Follow us @Spacedotcom and Facebook. Original article on Space.com.


Source link