"The largest parking area on Mars"



[ad_1]

<div> </ div> <div class =

The concept of artist. InSight landing site, Elysium Planitia.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Just a blaa.

It is a reasonable description of the unusual destination of the InSight spacecraft, now an hour from Mars's touch.

"Mars's largest car park," NASA says.

"Smooth and flat," says Matt Golombek's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

In fact, Elysium Planitia – the landing point somewhat north of the equator of Mars – is monotonous, not mountainous; a sandy beach that is inevitably clear.

"A place without big cliffs or great craters," says Golombek. "There are not too many steep slopes, not too much stones".

Just what NASA wants.

"Even though I will never say it anymore," adds Golombek, a geologist, who leads the mission landing team. "A fool is in the eyes of the viewer."

Especially after the deep-seated: When InSight is introduced, it will drop to five meters – to about 16 meters.

Come far or further, and NASA could understand the secrets behind the Mars surface.

Earth's image of Mars's Odyssey Orbit.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU

Location of InSight landing location, 373 miles from the Curiosity rover.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Virtually any vehicle, flat land is a reliable floor. Obstacles are dangerous.

The earth is a big stone, and InSight is prone to puncture; arrive on a steep slope and can tilt or tilt. Put on a surface that can not handle the load – some of Mars's dusts are "very fluffy," says Golombek, and the spacecraft "could effectively disappear."

Therefore, the targeting site, dull or not, works. None of these scenarios are likely to be. & Nbsp;"This is the best place we can find, he says.

NASA's search site lasted about three and a half years. Scientists from Mars exploring Elysium Planitia systematically and exhaustively; 150 high-resolution images turned out to be indispensable.

"We have enormously detailed information,Says Golombek. & Nbsp;"We measured slopes. Cattery distribution. Shadows of rocks. You do not play a remote location. "

Now, the Insight team – with reasonable confidence – can identify the most anything in an area of ​​about one meter.

"It's a table size," Golombek says.

Yet Elysium Planitia does not offer any guarantees.

"When we get to," she says, "we know how well we did."

Simulation: InSight touches down.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Unlike Mars rovers, InSight does not walk. Instead, the probe remains in place.

The task, literally groundbreaking, creates the mysterious Mars interior; two instruments on a spaceship go deep into Mars.

The seismometer on the balloon ball control detects landslides, dust storms, meteor rays and Marsquakes.

Self-hammering mechanical mole, coupled temperature sensors, you will find out how much heat it exits from the planetof& Nbsp; decor.

Now a tough part.

The stones under the surface of Insight are as cumbersome as the stones above.

Take the mole. Great for the character through Mars's soil. Great for small rocks four to five inches over (mole just pushing them out of the way). Not so great anything much bigger though sometimes the mole manages to move in the past.

But there's a limit. "It can not pass a tough, intact rock," says Golombek. If the mole collides directly with a big flat, it stops.

Just scarymole is one shot only point of the point, not to do.

"Once, and that is," he says.

NASA, however, says that a 16-foot landing – or more – is possible.

"It's a pretty big probability," predicts Golombek.

"But you never know for sure."

The concept of artist. InSight examines Mars's internal structure – its bark, sheath, and core.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

If InSight deals with Martian interior, scientists can infer Mars's early history. They can figure out how rocky planets formed and developed for over billions of years. Knowledge of how life lights up in the world – or fizzles out – is born.

These tips have long disappeared on earth, a geologically dynamic place that asked most of the past. But Mars is still as much as it was a while ago.

"Everything is wrapped in geology," Golombek says.

Break up and we can ultimately understand the birth of the country. Nothing.

"task"- a new podcast series on InSight's Martian trip presented by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory,is here.

The impression of the artist. InSight lands on Mars.Trust: NASA / GSCF

">

The concept of artist. InSight landing site, Elysium Planitia.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Just a blaa.

This is a reasonable description of the unusual destination of the InSight spacecraft, which is now a few hours away from Mars's contact.

"Mars's largest car park," NASA says.

"Smooth and flat," says Matt Golombek's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

In fact, Elysium Planitia – the landing point somewhat north of the equator of Mars – is monotonous, not mountainous; a sandy beach that is inevitably clear.

"A place without big cliffs or great craters," says Golombek. "There are not too many steep slopes, not too much stones".

Just what NASA wants.

"Even though I will never say it anymore," adds Golombek, a geologist, who leads the mission landing team. "A fool is in the eyes of the viewer."

Especially after the deep-seated: When InSight is introduced, it will drop to five meters – to about 16 meters.

Come far or further, and NASA could understand the secrets behind the Mars surface.

Earth's image of Mars's Odyssey Orbit.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / ASU

Location of InSight landing location, 373 miles from the Curiosity rover.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Virtually any vehicle, flat land is a reliable floor. Obstacles are dangerous.

The earth is a big stone, and InSight is prone to puncture; arrive on a steep slope and can tilt or tilt. Put on a surface that can not handle the load – some of Mars's dusts are "very fluffy," says Golombek, and the spacecraft "could effectively disappear."

Therefore, the targeting site, dull or not, works. None of these scenarios are likely to be there. "This is the best place we can find, he says.

NASA's search site lasted about three and a half years. Scientists from Mars exploring Elysium Planitia systematically and exhaustively; 150 high-resolution images turned out to be indispensable.

"We have enormously detailed information,Says Golombek. "We measured slopes. Cattery distribution. Shadows of rocks. You do not play a remote location. "

Now, the Insight team – with reasonable confidence – can identify the most anything in an area of ​​about one meter.

"It's a table size," Golombek says.

Yet Elysium Planitia does not offer any guarantees.

"When we get to," she says, "we know how well we did."

Simulation: InSight touches down.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Unlike Mars rovers, InSight does not walk. Instead, the probe remains in place.

The task, literally groundbreaking, creates the mysterious Mars interior; two instruments on a spaceship go deep into Mars.

The seismometer on the balloon ball control detects landslides, dust storms, meteor rays and Marsquakes.

Self-hammering mechanical mole, coupled temperature sensors, you will find out how much heat it exits from the planetof decor.

Now a tough part.

The stones under the surface of Insight are as cumbersome as the stones above.

Take the mole. Great for the character through Mars's soil. Great for small rocks four to five inches over (mole just pushing them out of the way). Not so great anything much bigger though sometimes the mole manages to move in the past.

But there's a limit. "It can not pass a tough, intact rock," says Golombek. If the mole collides directly with a big flat, it stops.

Just scarymole is one shot only point of the point, not to do.

"Once, and that is," he says.

NASA, however, says that a 16-foot landing – or more – is possible.

"It's a pretty big probability," predicts Golombek.

"But you never know for sure."

The concept of artist. InSight examines Mars's internal structure – its bark, sheath, and core.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

If InSight deals with Martian interior, scientists can infer Mars's early history. They can figure out how rocky planets formed and developed for over billions of years. Knowledge of how life lights up in the world – or fizzles out – is born.

These tips have long disappeared on earth, a geologically dynamic place that asked most of the past. But Mars is still as much as it was a while ago.

"Everything is wrapped in geology," Golombek says.

Turn, and we can ultimately understand the birth of the country. Nothing.

"task"- A new podcast series presented by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the InSight Mars journey is here.

The impression of the artist. InSight lands on Mars.Trust: NASA / GSCF

[ad_2]

Source link