Motor neuron nurses and supporters pass D & amp; Feet's disease



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Motoris neurons and supporters went through Palmerston's northern fire station and torque to support people with a disease.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

Motoris neurons and supporters went through Palmerston's northern fire station and torque to support people with a disease.

A short walk might seem like a marathon for those who suffer from motor neurons, so people on the streets show their support.

The nationwide Walk 2 Detective Neurone Disease was held on Sunday, an awareness of a day of muscle devastating illness that rob people about movement and speech and is ultimately fatal.

Fighting supporters and sufferers went to Palmerston North Fire Station and back to raise awareness and finance research work.

Many were dressed in blue clothes when they rounded the square, after which a fire truck came.

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Kylie Martin, 31, Palmerston North was diagnosed about 10 years ago and it began to worsen about five years ago.

She said she was traveling in her family – father, grandfather, uncle and her head were all dead of the motor neurons.

"I am obviously concerned about the next generation," said Martin of his four children.

He said he could not stand long and tired easily.

"Especially when you are trying to run a household with children, it is very unremitting."

Palmerston North's 70-year-old Marilyn Merriman learned that she had a motor neurone attack a year ago.

He now needs a walking frame to rotate, but her husband Ross pushed him into a wheelchair for a Sunday walk.

People walked in Palmerston North on Sunday to Walk 2 D & # 39; Feet engines neurone disease.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

People walked in Palmerston North on Sunday to Walk 2 D & # 39; Feet engines neurone disease.

"I've just been so out of breath," Merriman said. "We've been in the past for hours, but we can not even do it."

He said it was nice to meet other people who had the same problem.

In New Zealand, more than 3,000 people have a motor neuronal attack and each year more than 100 people die.

Motor Neurone Disease New Zealand's Carl Sunderland said: "As more and more people are diagnosed each year in New Zealand, we want to get these effects and provide the best support for motor neurons and their families."

Half of the funds raised from the country went to support the sick and the other half was successful in the treatment.

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