Saturday , February 27 2021

The crunching choir of the end of the First World War returns to Wellington



Singing and cheering, Various tubes and explosions, sparks and rags – these were the voices of the New Zealand streets almost 100 years ago.

After the end of World War I – which was a ceasefire signed – came to New Zealand, the country met on the streets to celebrate.

Evening Post an article from the beginning of November 1918, told the "grungy choir of gratifying sounds" as people poured cans and cans and sang their hearts.

Whitire and the New Zealand Dance School are studying their performance on scratch pads as a result

ROSA WOODS / STUFF

Students in Whitney and New Zealand Dancing School perform their performance on their mock stand, making them "living memorials".

That horrid chorus will be heard and re-seen when more than 40 students from the New Zealand Dance School and the Whitireia Magazine respect the armed day – November 11 – with a 20 minute free call He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018.

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By combining poison, poetry, dance and music, the piece looks at the perception of peace and the response to people at the end of the war.

New Zealand dancing school student Amit Noy, 16 and Whitireia student Sina Esera, 21 have been in training at He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018.

ROSA WOODS / STUFF

New Zealand dancing school student Amit Noy, 16 and Whitireia student Sina Esera, 21 have been in training at He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018.

Sixteen-year-old New Zealand dancing school student Amit Noy said dancers remembered the days of armor in their own art form: dance.

"There is something about dance that is always very vulnerable, and you are doing well in a transparent way. It is really awful to be present and experience this event."

He said that choreographer Malia Johnston wanted to bring artists from different backgrounds to bring sound quality to the performance.

A creative director and choreographer, Malia Johnston, sets the dancer at a brisk pace.

ROSA WOODS / STUFF

A creative director and choreographer, Malia Johnston, sets the dancer at a brisk pace.

For Whitireia students Sina Esera, He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018 was remembered more than the military's signature.

"When the war ended in 1918, it was the same year as the epidemic – a Spanish flu. This year has broke out the 100th anniversary and I wanted to keep that in mind [Samoan] through ancestors. It was a tragic event. "

Presentation programs began seriously earlier this week and has brought the dancers through their steps – some of the performance makes couples a narrow maze of dancing and living memories.

Although Noy and Esera said there was a couple of close calls, the practice was paying and the performance was coming together.

"There is so much energy and everyone is really excited to participate," Noy said.

He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018 is just one of the events at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park this Sunday. Remembering 100 years after the end of the First World War there will be a 100-year greetings and a sunset ceremony in the park.

PUKEAHU NATIONAL WAR MEMORIAL PROGRAM

November 11

10:45: 100 pistol greeting Te Papa in front

at 11: Two minutes of silence blown up by the Pukeahun Kättokahva

Followed by: He Wawā Waraki: Roaring Chorus 2018, a free 20 minute performance was held at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park

19:30: Sunset ceremony led by the New Zealand Defense Forces


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