Monday , August 2 2021

WATCH: Teenagers sing along with brainstorming to help doctors maintain their music



Seattle's teen singing through her brain cut to keep her talent.

The 19-year-old Kira Iaconett's musical journey was gone four years ago when she began to take the "bad" types of epilepsy that appeared to her every time she sang or listened to music.

"It was like a light switch that was not open, and suddenly I was a tone of deafness, I could not handle words in time with music, and could not sing", she was said to be saying Seattle Children's Hospital.
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Initially, Kira shook off 2 minutes of bad disturbances, but when his epilepsy increased, he was forced to see a neurologist.
Like People reports that the reason for Kiran seizures was unknown until the MRI scans for Seattle's children uncovered a calcified tumor that pushed his hearing aid into the right temporal brain of the brain – because of the actual seizure.

MRI images

Photo: Seattle Children's Hospital

"His tumor was discovered due to the unusual type of epilepsy he had called a choreogenic epilepsy," says Neuroscience Center's neuroscientist Jason Hauptman of Seattle Children.

He added that Kiran's convulsions were fired by singing or listening to music, which was regrettable when he was 19, when he was a budding musician.

This is because Dr. Hauptman's experience came into being and he created a plan for awakening craniotomy – a surgery that required him and his team to remove his tumor while he was under anesthesia and then started to sing. In doing so, Hauptman placed brain areas that are activated when he hits the notes and guided them away, thus preserving his ability to play and listen to music.

"The focus was not only on the treatment of the tumor but on the improvement of life. We wanted to keep things that he cares, like his passion for performing a career in music theater," Hauptman said.

Kira cutting guitar

Photo: Seattle Children's Hospital

As for Kiran, she covered Weezer's 2001 hit "Sun Island", an operational bed, and is already on the way to recovery. In fact, he was seen playing guitar and singing just 48 hours after surgery.

"The biggest fear before surgery was that scenes would be realized," he said. "Now I want to go back to the stage and do as soon as I can."

The opera "concert" video was sent by a hospital that showed members of the surgical team to Kira in his presentation.

See it here:


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