Arsenal reveals a battery storage system that flows into the Emirates Stadium



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An overview of matches at The Emirates Stadium, Arsenal home page, when Henrikh Mkhitaryan Arsenal passes between the Arsenal and Sporting CP at the UEFA Europa League E match at the Emirates Stadium on 8 November 2018 in London, UK. (Image: Robbie Jay Barratt – AMA / Getty Images)Getty

Arsenal may not be the leader in England's Premier League, but the release of the new battery storage system has become the leader of the Green Energy League.

When trying to curb energy costs and support green energy, Arsenal has become the first UK football club to be able to install a 60,000-seat Emirates stadium battery backup system for a perfect match.

"This is a big step forward when we can boost energy and develop work to reduce carbon footprint as an organization," said Arsenal's CEO Vinai Venkatesham said in the publication. "From 2017, we have won green energy thanks to Octopus Energy, and the battery storage system supports follow-up."

The 3 megawatt lithium-ion battery installed by the UK energy company Pivot Power can save enough energy to the Emirates Stadium in order to be able to use the full 90-minute match. At first, only 2 megawatts of capacity will be used, and the final megawatt will be launched next summer. & Nbsp; The club already has pure electricity from the network of solar cells and anaerobic digesters.

The new battery storage system is not just a way to save money through renewable energy, but also a potential source of income. The club can buy power from its partner Octopus Energy when prices are cheap, store and sell it to the multinational electricity and gas company's National Grid when prices are at its peak.

"Arsenal shows how football clubs and other big users can save money and support UK climate change and clean air goals," & nbsp; Pivot Power CEO Matt Allen said in his statement. "Batteries play a key role in creating a cost-effective and low-carbon economy and we want to help authorities, local authorities and businesses to seize the opportunities they offer."

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An overview of matches at The Emirates Stadium, Arsenal home page, when Henrikh Mkhitaryan Arsenal passes between the Arsenal and Sporting CP at the UEFA Europa League E match at the Emirates Stadium on 8 November 2018 in London, UK. (Image: Robbie Jay Barratt – AMA / Getty Images)Getty

Arsenal may not be the leader in England's Premier League, but the release of the new battery storage system has become the leader of the Green Energy League.

In an effort to curb energy costs and support green energy, Arsenal has become the first UK football club to be able to install the 60,000-seat Emirates Stadium for a full battery storage system.

"This is a big step forward when we can boost energy and develop work to reduce carbon footprint as an organization," said Vinai Venkatesham, managing director of Arsenal. "From 2017, we have won green energy thanks to Octopus Energy, and the battery storage system supports follow-up."

The 3 megawatt lithium battery installed by the UK energy company Pivot Power can save enough energy for the Emirates stadium for 90 minutes. Initially, only 2 megawatts of capacity will be used, and the final megawatt must be connected next summer. The club already uses pure electricity from the network of solar cells and anaerobic digesters.

The new battery storage system is not just a way to save money through renewable energy, but also a potential source of income. The club can buy power from its partner Octopus Energy when prices are cheap, store and sell it to the multinational electricity and gas company's National Grid when prices are at its peak.

"Arsenal shows how football clubs and other big users can save money and support UK climate change and clean air goals," said Matt Allen, CEO of Pivot Power. "Batteries play a key role in creating a cost-effective and low-carbon economy and we want to help authorities, local authorities and businesses to seize the opportunities they offer."

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