Thursday , April 15 2021

Perhaps the Neanderthals were not so bad and brutal: NPR



Religious religions are believed to be using dangerous neighborhoods for hunting techniques by using non-firearms, such as pushing spears described in this artist's presentation.

Gleiver Prieto & Katerina Harvati


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Gleiver Prieto & Katerina Harvati

Religious religions are believed to be using dangerous neighborhoods for hunting techniques by using non-firearms, such as pushing spears described in this artist's presentation.

Gleiver Prieto & Katerina Harvati

Neanderthals may bring some pictures of cartoon-brutist, which break into each other's clubs.

But although numerous Neandertalo skeletons have been exposed, showing serious head and neck injuries, a new study shows that their lives are not as violent as stereotyping means.

In fact, the levels of Neanderthal skull injuries are very similar to those of previous modern humans according to researchers who were published today in the Nature journal.

"There is no statistical difference between these two, which means that they can not be separated," says research professor Katerina Harvati, a paleoanthropologist from the Tübingen University in Germany.

"I definitely think that there is evidence that these guys mound else each other," at least at least no more than the early modern man, says Fred Smith, Illinois State University professor who specializes in Neandertekseihin, who were not involved in the study.

Smith says he is not surprised by the results, and for many years "has been focusing heavily on the differences between Neanderthals and us."

It changed in 2010, when scientists discovered that Neanderthals gave genetic material to modern humans and made them an early age. Since then, research has been challenging to describe Neanderthals as wild troglodythies. Scientists have suggested that they may have made art, enjoy long childhoods, sometimes eat vegetarian diets, and even wear jewelry and makeup.

The researchers compile a database of published articles describing 204 single Neandermanthal and early Paleolithic modern human bones, including skull injuries. Samples come from Europe and Asia and come from about 20,000 to 80,000 years ago.

In both groups, men were most likely to have cranial injuries than women – who according to the University of Tübingen explained the division of labor between men and women or culturally defined gender-specific behaviors and activities.

And even though Neanderthals and early modern human trauma levels were statistically the same, neandermanthals who suffered head trauma before the age of 30 were also more likely to be younger.

"This observation does not necessarily mean that modern people are staying longer, but they may be due to the fact that Neanderthals maintain lifelong cranial injuries as modern-day populist populations," he says. "[Or] it could also show that neandermanthals had a higher risk of mortality after injuries to backbone skull compared to upper paleolithic modern humans. "

It may also mean that early modern people would be better off to care for the injured.

Harvati says there are probably many reasons for these head injuries. Except for hunting and human-intensity violence, in both groups, skull injuries were likely to be "disasters of highly mobile hunter-collector's lifestyles in frozen environments and carnivorous attacks".

It should be noted that researchers compare neanderthals to early modern humans because they have probably been similar lifestyles. Comparing Neanderthals to People today, says Harvati, would be like comparing "apples to oranges".

He adds that today's people naturally have "completely different dangers that can lead to extremely serious traumatic injuries, which are simply not among modern Neanderthals or Paleolithic modern people".

Dangers such as car accidents – or ballistic trauma of firearms.


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